How to

Our garage door how to section of our website is a great place to learn how to maintain your garage door system with our garage door, garage floor and gutter how to section.

119 - Millennium Collection - Carriage House Garage Door - White - Glass
How to

How to Paint a Garage Door

119 - Millennium Collection - Carriage House Garage Door - White - Glass

How to Properly Paint a Garage Door

BY ROBERT BROOME, OWNER

Painting your garage door can completely revitalize the curb appeal of your home and will add a protective outer coating for your garage’s entranceway. But this project can quickly go awry if you don’t follow a few simple steps for painting a garage door correctly.

Today, we’ll outline everything you need to know about how to paint a garage door to get the best results possible.

Benefits of Painting a Garage Door

When everything is functioning properly, it can be easy to forget your garage door is even there. However, as time goes on, the appearance of your garage door can begin to lose its luster. Painting your garage door is a quick and easy way to enhance the appearance of your home. You can add a new color for a sharp looking contrast, or even add a textured paint to give it a wood-look.

Beyond giving the front of your home a better look, another benefit you may not have considered is how painting your garage door helps to seal it off for protection against the elements. Small scratches and dents that wear off your garage door’s protective paint can expose the metal beneath over time. When subjected to the elements, metal will rust and corrode. Properly priming and painting any exposed metal adds that protective layer back in, which can extend the life of your garage door.

Make Sure You Have the Right Tools for Painting

As with most things in life, having the right tools to do the job correctly is half the battle. While it can be tempting to go with the economy options for a lot of these tools, you’ll receive better results and a more finished product if you use high-quality, professional grade tools and equipment.

Your Garage Door Painting Toolbox

To paint your garage door properly, make sure you have the following tools and equipment handy for a hassle-free experience:
  • Disposable nitrile gloves
  • Safety eyeglasses
  • Sandpaper with fine grit
  • Large sponge
  • Cloth or terry towel
  • Painter’s drop cloth or plastic sheeting
  • High quality exterior-rated latex paint
  • Step ladder
  • Face mask
  • Scrub brush
  • Cleaner (recipes for garage door cleaner below)
  • Hose or large garden sprayer
  • Painter’s tape
  • Metal primer
  • Paint roller
With the right equipment, your garage door painting project will go smoothly and produce better results. Continue reading to view our outline on how to properly prep your garage door for painting.

Prep Your Garage Door for Painting

First and foremost, the garage door surface must be properly prepared for painting. A thorough, deep clean before painting can be performed using common household materials. Below, we’ll outline two options for mixing your own, basic household garage door cleaners.

Option 1: Laundry Detergent Garage Door Cleaner

  • 1 cup laundry detergent to 5 gallons of warm water.
  • Any household detergent may be used to prep your garage door for painting. Use a laundry detergent that has less than 0.5% phosphate.
  • Mix 1 cup laundry detergent with 5 gallons of warm water. Do not use a blend of detergents and do not use detergents with bleach.

Option 2: Ammonia Garage Door Cleaner

  • 1 cup household ammonia to 5 gallons of room temperature water.
  • Household ammonia may be used as another option for cleaning your garage door and preparing it for repainting.
  • Be sure to use room temperature water.

Clean Your Garage Door

To wash the garage door, you can use either option of cleaning solution, in addition to a well-soaked cloth, sponge or very soft bristled brush . A low-pressure spray washer can also be used. Once the door is washed, rinse well with clean water to eliminate the possibility of leaving any leftover residue on the door that may interfere with painting.

Sand and Buff the Garage Door

If you encounter minor imperfections, such as small scratches that have not left the metal substrate exposed, they can be lightly sanded or buffed to create a smoother surface. With your gloves, safety glasses, and mask on, you can carefully sand the area. But be careful not to overbuff the surface—you do not want the metal substrate exposed as this can increase the chance of rusting.

To prevent rusting, any exposed metal must be treated. If there is exposed metal on the garage door, lightly sand the area and apply a primer specifically designed to protect exposed galvanized steel from rust and corrosion.

Painting Your Garage Door

After the door has been cleaned and all imperfections or exposed metal have been addressed, it’s time to paint. For the best results, painting must be completed within 24 hours using high-quality latex exterior house paint.

Step 1: Choose Your Day Wisely

Pay close attention to the weather in your area. It’s best to avoid painting when temperatures are below 50 degrees Fahrenheit. The best temperature range is between 50 degrees and 75 degrees Fahrenheit. You’ll also want a relatively low humidity, without any rain in the forecast at least for a couple days to really help the paint set in well.

Step 2: Final Prep for the Paint and Door

Ensure the paint is mixed well—mechanical mixing is recommended to ensure that no settling on the bottom of the container remains. Use painter’s tape to cover up anything, like windows that you don’t want paint on. Place the painter’s drop cloth on both sides of the door to catch any drips.

Step 3: Paint Away

Apply a uniform coat of paint at the manufacturer’s recommended dry film thickness range. Generally, one-gallon of paint is more than enough for a two-car garage door. Start at the bottom, then ease over to the middle and continue to work your way up. Use your step ladder to reach the high portion of the door. Save the trim for last. Let the paint dry for at least 12 hours before attempting a second coat. Once completely finished, remove your painters tape and let your new paint dry overnight.

The next day, use the “touch test” to make sure the paint is dry and isn’t sticky. High-humidity like we can get in the North Carolina summers can take longer to dry. Once the paint is dry to the touch, you can open and close your door worry-free.

Garage Door Painting Pro Tips

  • The garage door must be completely dry before painting.
  • Painting should be done early in the morning to give yourself enough time to finish.
  • Please note, the instructions we’ve outlined above are a general summary of proper painting practices and does not cover all aspects of repainting steel garage doors.

Schedule a Garage Door Consultation

When it comes to your garage door, it’s easy to push a button and forget about the whole operation until there’s a problem. For any garage door repair questions you may have, our skilled technicians can be a trusted resource to help you understand all your options.

To book a free garage door consultation with one of experienced garage professionals, just give us a call at 704-397-3002, book your appointment right online, or fill out our handy online contact form and we’ll be in touch.

  • Belmont
  • Charlotte
  • Cornelius
  • Concord
  • Davidson
  • Denver
  • Gastonia
  • Huntersville
  • Harrisburg
  • Indian Trail
  • Indian Land
  • Kannapolis
  • Matthews
  • Fort Mill
  • Mint Hill
  • Mooresville
  • Mount Holly
  • Stanley
  • Waxhaw
  • Weddington
  • Rock Hill
  • Hi, I'm Tisha Broome. I'm one of the owners here at Presto. I'm an expert in helping clients choose the right garage door, garage floor and gutter system. I can also help you with all of your repair and maintenance needs. You can text me with any questions. I typically respond in less then 15 minutes during normal business hours. I'm available to speak by phone, email or by video call if you'd like me to see the visual details of your project.

  • Terry Caldwell
  • Hi, I'm Terry Caldwell. I've been a member of the Presto Team since 2015. I've been working with clients to choose their perfect product solution since 2018. Before that, I was our lead garage door installer and then our lead repair technician. I can help you find solutions to even the most difficult problems. Feel free to text me your questions. I typically respond in less than 15 minutes during business hours. I'm available to speak by phone, email or by video call if you'd like me to see the visual details of your project.

  • #2 Traditional Double Garage Door
    How to

    Garage Door Rough Opening

    #2 Traditional Double Garage Door

    Garage Door Rough Opening

    BY ROBERT BROOME, OWNER

    In this post, I would like to discuss how to measure for a new garage door. I get calls on a regular basis from customers that are closing in carport or extending the size of their garage doors. They often want to know what the rough opening should be for the door that they should order. The measurements they give me are typically quite odd, and I become very apprehensive about ordering a garage door for them. For some reason, these odd size doors being ordered incorrectly somehow becomes my fault.  So, in the spirit of good business, and neither of us getting stuck with a useless garage door, I would like to go over some terminology and what measurements you will need to shop for a new garage door.

    measure-garage-door-2

    What you need to know

    1st of all, let’s cover the difference in a rough opening and a finished opening. A rough opening is the size of the opening before any finish work has been done. If you have a rough opening that is unfinished and you need a guide in to getting the door ready for an installation you can find our how to guide here.   For everyone else, let’s cover some basics. I know many of you want to pick up the phone or scour the internet for prices and models, but you may not have enough information. You will 1st need to know the width and the height of the garage door opening. If you have a door that is being removed, do not measure the existing door. Measure the opening itself. Knowing the width and height of the door will give you the tools needed to do some research and know the price points of what you may want to buy. There are other measurements and variables needed to be gathered before ordering a new garage door, but that is typically gathered by a garage door professional when he is on site. These variables can add a small amount to your overall investment, but it’s minimal. Like many that I have dealt with in the past, you may be confident in your ability to get these measurements right and feel that you can get your new door ordered with a simple phone call. I know that salespeople in your home is super uncomfortable, and some of their rap is unbearable, but it is always best to let the people installing the door do a site check. If they make a mistake, it’s on them, and the liability is not on you. This post is intended for purposes of clarifying how garage door sizes work and opening preparation.

    Standard Sizes

    Standard garage doors in our area are 8′, 9′, 16′ and 18′ wide. 99% of the residential garage doors that we run across are different than these widths. 1/2″ or 1″ in one direction of the other will won’t typically cause you to have to shop for a non-standard garage door size. Next, you will need to know your door height. Standard garage doors start at 7′ tall and increase in increments of one foot. For residential homes, 99% of doors are either exactly 7′ or 8′ tall. When pricing your door, you will need to price a garage door exactly the size of the opening, so when calling around for price points be sure that you have this information in hand. You may not want to hire the lowest cost provider in town, but you will want a fair price from a company that will honor their warranties and offers a quality product. Happy shopping!

    • Belmont
    • Charlotte
    • Cornelius
    • Concord
    • Davidson
    • Denver
    • Gastonia
    • Huntersville
    • Harrisburg
    • Indian Trail
    • Indian Land
    • Kannapolis
    • Matthews
    • Fort Mill
    • Mint Hill
    • Mooresville
    • Mount Holly
    • Stanley
    • Waxhaw
    • Weddington
    • Rock Hill
  • Hi, I'm Tisha Broome. I'm one of the owners here at Presto. I'm an expert in helping clients choose the right garage door, garage floor and gutter system. I can also help you with all of your repair and maintenance needs. You can text me with any questions. I typically respond in less then 15 minutes during normal business hours. I'm available to speak by phone, email or by video call if you'd like me to see the visual details of your project.

  • Terry Caldwell
  • Hi, I'm Terry Caldwell. I've been a member of the Presto Team since 2015. I've been working with clients to choose their perfect product solution since 2018. Before that, I was our lead garage door installer and then our lead repair technician. I can help you find solutions to even the most difficult problems. Feel free to text me your questions. I typically respond in less than 15 minutes during business hours. I'm available to speak by phone, email or by video call if you'd like me to see the visual details of your project.

  • opener- security
    How to

    8 Ways to Improve Garage Door Security

    opener- security

    8 Ways to Improve Garage Door Security

    BY ROBERT BROOME, OWNER

    Your garage door could be an easy way for criminals to get into your home if you aren’t careful. In this article, we’ll look at eight of the best tips for improving garage door security, which will help to keep you, your family, and your home safer. Older model doors are particularly problematic because they don’t have the same features. Those doors more than a decade old should get a replacement. They will function better, be safer, and provide better security. Regardless of how old your door is though, the following eight tips will help to improve your security.

    Security Tip#1 – Your Remote
    Never leave the remote for the garage door in your vehicle. If a thief breaks into the car, he will have the remote, which they could then use to get inside of your home. A much better idea than keeping your remote on the visor is to invest in a smaller remote you can clip right to your keys. This ensures you never lose it.

    Security Tip#2 – Keep the House Locked
    If you have a home with an attached garage, you should always make sure you keep your home locked. Instead of using a just a typical lock, you should consider adding a deadbolt. It’s also a good idea to use a digital entry lock on the door that leads into your home. You do not want to make it easy for criminals.

    Security Tip#3 – Never Leave the Garage Door Open
    Only open your garage door when you are going in and out. Don’t simply open up the door and leave it open when you are running inside and outside with groceries and the like. A thief only needs a minute to slip into the garage. Some people leave their garage doors open all the time, and this is an invitation to thieves.

    Security Tip#4 – Cover the Windows in the Garage Door
    You don’t want thieves to see everything that you have in your garage. You could have expensive tools, bikes, and other gear that you want to protect. Windows that look right into the garage and show people what you have are a bad idea. You could forego the windows, or at least add tinting or frost to them to make it impossible for the thieves to see inside.

    Security Tip#5 – Use a Padlock
    If you will be out of town, you should add an additional padlock to the garage as a means to keep it just a bit safer.

    Security Tip#6 – Extend the Security System
    If you have a security system for the rest of your home, you can’t forget about the garage. Make sure that you extend the alarm and camera system to this most vulnerable room of the house as well.

    Security Tip#7 – Maintain
    The garage door is one of the doors in the house that no one really pays much attention to unless there is trouble. You should make sure that you check the door and the motorized elements to ensure they are working properly. If they have any issues, have someone repair them right away.

    Security Tip#8 – Illumination
    Consider what’s happening on the outside of the garage as well. If it is dark and you do not have enough lighting, it means that thieves will feel more comfortable approaching. By adding some exterior lighting, it makes approaching the door a bit more dangerous for criminals, and most will simply avoid your house.
    These tips are very easy to implement into your life right now. They are simple, but they really will help you to improve the quality of your garage door security.

    Our company has a wide variety garage door safety and security products. Call us if you have a need.

    • Belmont
    • Charlotte
    • Cornelius
    • Concord
    • Davidson
    • Denver
    • Gastonia
    • Huntersville
    • Harrisburg
    • Indian Trail
    • Indian Land
    • Kannapolis
    • Matthews
    • Fort Mill
    • Mint Hill
    • Mooresville
    • Mount Holly
    • Stanley
    • Waxhaw
    • Weddington
    • Rock Hill
  • Hi, I'm Tisha Broome. I'm one of the owners here at Presto. I'm an expert in helping clients choose the right garage door, garage floor and gutter system. I can also help you with all of your repair and maintenance needs. You can text me with any questions. I typically respond in less then 15 minutes during normal business hours. I'm available to speak by phone, email or by video call if you'd like me to see the visual details of your project.

  • Terry Caldwell
  • Hi, I'm Terry Caldwell. I've been a member of the Presto Team since 2015. I've been working with clients to choose their perfect product solution since 2018. Before that, I was our lead garage door installer and then our lead repair technician. I can help you find solutions to even the most difficult problems. Feel free to text me your questions. I typically respond in less than 15 minutes during business hours. I'm available to speak by phone, email or by video call if you'd like me to see the visual details of your project.

  • smart-banner-850
    How to

    How to Measure for a New Garage Door

    smart-banner-850

    How to Measure for a New Garage Door

    BY ROBERT BROOME, OWNER

    Some folks are going to look at this post and think, wow, is there someone out there that can’t figure this out on their own. Yes, there is. It’s usually the person that assumes that they have all of the information.  They call me every day, and I have to walk them through the process. Getting the right garage door for your home is a little more complex than just being a single or double car garage door. Let’s take a closer look at the information that you are going to need to install a new garage door, so that you can get this process started.

    measure-garage-door-2

    First, Measure the garage door opening in feet and inches. This will be the measurement that you provide to your local garage door dealership. Always give the dealer the width first, and then the height. These measurements are generally in round numbers. Common widths for single car garage doors are 8’, 9’ and 10’. Standard double car Garage Doors are 16 or 18’ wide. Standard heights for both double and single car garage doors are 7’ and 8’. There are many variations, but these are the standard sizes.

    Next, you will need to measure for side room. Pull a tape measure from the end of the opening to the closest wall or obstruction. If you don’t have at least 4’’ then you most likely won’t have the ability to install a door in that opening.

    Next, you will need to measure the door for headroom. Here, you will take a measurement from the ceiling of the garage to the top of the garage door opening. This will allow you to determine the lift that you need for your new garage door. You will need 13’’ for a standard lift door, and 16’’ if that door will have a garage door opener installed. Anything less than this measurement will result in needing low headroom double track.  Note this measurement, and have it handy when calling your garage door dealer for a quote.

    Last, you will need to measure your  ”backroom”. This is the Distance from the garage door opening to the back wall of the garage. Be sure to note any obstructions that might interfere with your garage door being able to open properly.  A 7’ tall garage door will need 7’ of back room, so this is a concern worth noting before measuring for a new door.

    If you would like more information on measuring for a new garage door contact Garage Doors & More .

    Not in the Charlotte area, and need a new garage door? Visit our Amarr Garage Door door designer. You can build and buy a new commercial or residential garage door online.

    • Belmont
    • Charlotte
    • Cornelius
    • Concord
    • Davidson
    • Denver
    • Gastonia
    • Huntersville
    • Harrisburg
    • Indian Trail
    • Indian Land
    • Kannapolis
    • Matthews
    • Fort Mill
    • Mint Hill
    • Mooresville
    • Mount Holly
    • Stanley
    • Waxhaw
    • Weddington
    • Rock Hill
  • Hi, I'm Tisha Broome. I'm one of the owners here at Presto. I'm an expert in helping clients choose the right garage door, garage floor and gutter system. I can also help you with all of your repair and maintenance needs. You can text me with any questions. I typically respond in less then 15 minutes during normal business hours. I'm available to speak by phone, email or by video call if you'd like me to see the visual details of your project.

  • Terry Caldwell
  • Hi, I'm Terry Caldwell. I've been a member of the Presto Team since 2015. I've been working with clients to choose their perfect product solution since 2018. Before that, I was our lead garage door installer and then our lead repair technician. I can help you find solutions to even the most difficult problems. Feel free to text me your questions. I typically respond in less than 15 minutes during business hours. I'm available to speak by phone, email or by video call if you'd like me to see the visual details of your project.

  • pinnacle-garage-doors-5
    How to

    Garage Door Weatherstripping

    pinnacle-garage-doors-5

    Garage Door Weatherstripping

    BY ROBERT BROOME, OWNER

    Energy efficiency has become a huge hot button issue in our society. The conversation is “fueled” by high energy cost, and by possible damage to our planet. Homeowners spend a great deal of time and effort researching ways to make their homes more efficient. One very inexpensive way to keep out the draft is by changing out the old weatherstripping around your garage door. In many cases, we see homes with no weatherstripping at all, or the weatherstripping is worn or installed improperly. Below, I will provide a list of materials needed, and the proper steps to move you toward a better looking and less drafty installation.

    You will need:

    • Confidence
    • Color matched Garage Door Weatherstripping
    • Claw Hammer
    • Color Matched Trim Nails
    • Color Matched Caulking
    • Razor Knife
    • Hand Saw
    • Tape Measure
    • Friend or family member

    As I said above, in many cases the garage door weatherstripping was never installed, so just feel free to skip the removal steps. 1st, we need to get that old weatherstripping off of your garage door jambs. We will achieve this by using a razor knife and a claw hammer. 1st, take the razor knife, and run it down the back of the weatherstripping. This will give you the ability to wedge the claw of the hammer behind the weatherstripping. If you have aluminum coil stock covering your jambs this may become a slow tedious process. The objective is to lift the vinyl only in the areas where nails are located, so that you can remove the nails with the claw of the hammer. Once this is finished just lay the old weatherstripping to the side. We may be able to use it for reference later.

    Next, take out your tape measure, and get a measurement from the top weather seal that you removed. This will be the piece that we replace first. If the piece was destroyed or not available just pull a very tight measurement the width of the opening. Use your saw to cut the garage door weatherstripping to within 1/8 of your measurement. This will give you a tight fit. Now, lay the weatherstripping down on a flat surface and begin to hammer your trim nails in to the garage door weatherstripping. Start on one end, and use the width of the hammer to find consistent spacing. As you get closer to the opposite end, adjust as you see fit to keep a good pattern. Now, open your garage door, and line up the front edge of the vinyl to the edge of the garage door opening. Have a friend or family member hold the other end to ensure that the cut was correct. After you get proper placement, drive the 1st nail in to the garage door jambs. Don’t drive the nails all the way in. Leave yourself room for error. After you confirm that the positioning is correct, it is simple to go back and drive all of the nails in securely. Now, for the sides, pull a measurement from your concrete slab up to the bottom of the garage door weatherstripping that you just installed. After cutting, install in the same fashion. To check for correct positioning, close the garage door and check for gaps. Once this is confirmed drive in the nail heads, apply caulking to the back edge, and your install is complete.

    • Belmont
    • Charlotte
    • Cornelius
    • Concord
    • Davidson
    • Denver
    • Gastonia
    • Huntersville
    • Harrisburg
    • Indian Trail
    • Indian Land
    • Kannapolis
    • Matthews
    • Fort Mill
    • Mint Hill
    • Mooresville
    • Mount Holly
    • Stanley
    • Waxhaw
    • Weddington
    • Rock Hill
  • Hi, I'm Tisha Broome. I'm one of the owners here at Presto. I'm an expert in helping clients choose the right garage door, garage floor and gutter system. I can also help you with all of your repair and maintenance needs. You can text me with any questions. I typically respond in less then 15 minutes during normal business hours. I'm available to speak by phone, email or by video call if you'd like me to see the visual details of your project.

  • Terry Caldwell
  • Hi, I'm Terry Caldwell. I've been a member of the Presto Team since 2015. I've been working with clients to choose their perfect product solution since 2018. Before that, I was our lead garage door installer and then our lead repair technician. I can help you find solutions to even the most difficult problems. Feel free to text me your questions. I typically respond in less than 15 minutes during business hours. I'm available to speak by phone, email or by video call if you'd like me to see the visual details of your project.

  • frame garage door
    How to

    How to Frame a Garage Door Opening

    frame garage door

    How to Frame a Garage Door Opening

    BY ROBERT BROOME, OWNER

    It seems that everyday I get a call from a customer that is making changes to a garage and needs to know the best way to prepare the garage door opening. Words like, “rough opening” are thrown around, and I’m not sure if we are speaking about the same thing. In our business, we refer to rough openings as the size of the opening before the finished lumber has been added to the jambs. Ordering a garage door based on a rough opening size can leave you with a door that is too big. To make my life more simple, I have created this blog post, so that I could email it to my clients to make things more clear. I’m no wordsmith, and things may get goofed up, so I have provided a diagram as a back up. Good luck on your new garage door framing project.

    What You'll Need To Do The Project

    To do this project properly, you’re going to need to gather some tools. This is what I used the last time I framed an opening. 

    • Tape Measure
    • Pencil
    • Circular Saw
    • Hammer
    • 2″ x 6″ Lumber
    • 1 used 16p Nails (The wood was getting wrapped with aluminum)

    Let's get started

    how-to-frame-a=garage-door-opening

    When referring to a rough opening, this is a garage door opening that has been framed with 2×4 lumber, but no finish work has been completed.

    1. Frame the rough opening to 3 inches wider than the garage door you have selected. If you are installing a 9′ wide garage door, the opening will be 9’3″ wide. Once finished, the opening will be 9′ wide. The finished opening should be the same width and height as the garage door you have purchased.

    2. Frame the rough opening to a height that is 1.5’’ taller than the door that you have selected. If the door is 7′ tall, frame the opening 7’1.5″

    Finish the opening

    3. To finish the opening cut the header from 2″ thick lumber. In my area, the lumber is either 6″ or 8″ wide.  Install using 16p framing nails. Once this is header is installed, you should have a measurement from concrete to the bottom of the header equal to your garage door height.

    4. Now, install the vertical jambs. Use the same 2″ thick lumber. Pull a measurement from the concrete to the bottom of the header that you just installed. Use the same framing nails.

    Install The Goal Post

    Below, you will see an illustration of what we call the goal post. This view is from the inside of the garage looking out. The job is to install lumber to mount your track and springs, so that you have a garage door installation that’s safe and will last. We never recommend installing a garage door without a proper goal post.

    garage door frame detail

    5. Pull a measurement from the floor of your garage to the ceiling next to the garage door opening. Cut two 2’’ x 6’’ pieces of lumber, and attach to the face of the wall running from the edge of your garage door jambs to the ceiling of your garage. This lumber will be used to attach your garage door track, and a portion of your assembly.

    6. Next, pull a measurement between the 2’’x 6’’ lumber that you just attached to the face of the garage wall. Now, cut a 2’’x 6’’ piece of lumber to that measurement. Attach lumber to the face of the garage wall to the edge of the garage door header

    7. Last, pull a measurement from the top of the 2’’ x 6’’ piece of lumber that you just installed to the ceiling of the garage. Cut a 2’’x 6’’ piece of lumber, and nail to the face of wall exactly in the center of the garage header. This piece of lumber will be used to attach the center bracket of your garage door spring assembly.

    Click on the image below for clear detail and drawing.

    garage door opening

    Common Issues

    One issue that we run in to quite often is when the 2’x6″ lumber that the track mounts to does not go all the way to the floor. In some cases, the block or brick foundation is wider than the wall built above it. See the attached image. In this case, you will have to chip away the brick so that the lumber is 1/4″ from the floor. It is best practice that there is a small space between the floor and lumber to keep the wood from rotting.

    Thank you for visiting our website. I would love to know how we may be able to restructure the content on this page to make the instructions more clear. Feel free to leave a comment below. If you are in the Charlotte  or Raleigh area and are in the market for a new garage door give us a call.

    • Belmont
    • Charlotte
    • Cornelius
    • Concord
    • Davidson
    • Denver
    • Gastonia
    • Huntersville
    • Harrisburg
    • Indian Trail
    • Indian Land
    • Kannapolis
    • Matthews
    • Fort Mill
    • Mint Hill
    • Mooresville
    • Mount Holly
    • Stanley
    • Waxhaw
    • Weddington
    • Rock Hill
  • Hi, I'm Tisha Broome. I'm one of the owners here at Presto. I'm an expert in helping clients choose the right garage door, garage floor and gutter system. I can also help you with all of your repair and maintenance needs. You can text me with any questions. I typically respond in less then 15 minutes during normal business hours. I'm available to speak by phone, email or by video call if you'd like me to see the visual details of your project.

  • Terry Caldwell
  • Hi, I'm Terry Caldwell. I've been a member of the Presto Team since 2015. I've been working with clients to choose their perfect product solution since 2018. Before that, I was our lead garage door installer and then our lead repair technician. I can help you find solutions to even the most difficult problems. Feel free to text me your questions. I typically respond in less than 15 minutes during business hours. I'm available to speak by phone, email or by video call if you'd like me to see the visual details of your project.